The War on Drugs Is Not Dead Yet

While some mouth the words of ending the drug war as an abysmal failure that’s destroyed hundreds of thousands of lives while accomplishing nothing, the mouth of an old-time drug warrior can be heard screaming and spitting. Welcome back, Bill Bennett.

The Sentencing Reform and Corrections Act now before Congress is based on a lie — that drug dealing is not a violent crime. Americans have been told this lie for years even as we witness the violence and death caused by drug dealers in our communities. Now, this lie is propelling legislation through Congress that will destroy more lives.

It’s not drugs. It’s violence. VIOLENCE! And anyone who says otherwise is a liar. A LIAR!!!

How can the drug trade be victimless when most Americans know a victim? How can it be non-violent when we witness the carnage every night on the local news?

The countless Americans victimized by drugs know the truth, as does anyone who has looked at the facts about America’s prison population.

There are very few people who are bold enough to cite to a WSJ op-ed and link it to the anchor text “facts.” That’s how bold Bennett is. He is one bold dude.

Most people aren’t going to be swayed by Bill’s shenanigans, his laughable misuse of statistics, or his over-the-top hype.  But that’s not why Bennett has come out of hiding to reveal his deepest thoughts.

By softening punishments for these traffickers, as this legislation does, Congress would give convicted dealers shorter sentences and early release causing destruction to communities across America. Moreover, this push to release experienced traffickers is occurring at the same time our nation is enduring a 440-percent increase over the past seven years in heroin overdose deaths.

Boom. That’s why. See that part about our nation enduring a 440% increase in heroin overdose deaths?  That’s the hook. That’s the scare tactic. That’s the new talking point of the drug warriors.  If you look at his link, you will quickly realized that Bill is severely math-impaired. While the number is up, it’s not 440%. But it is up substantially, and most people can’t do math, and drugs are violence, so what’s the big deal?

No family that has lost a child or a mother or a brother to addiction can be told there are no victims. No school or community believes the empty rhetoric that a lost child was “only hurting herself.” There are too many innocent victims, from the infants born addicted to the grandparent who stands beside the grave of the child of their child.

Does Bill know how to jerk a tear or what? If the SJWs could steal him away from the drug war, they would have everything their heart wanted. But Bill’s dedication to the drug war, his being called back from the pasture, is part of a larger effort to expand drugs into violence, and spread the culpability from user and dealer to the murderers who enable them. Why? Because murder is violence. Everyone knows that.

When Jarret McCasland and his fiancee decided to celebrate her 19th birthday with heroin, it meant the end of her life and the end of his freedom.

Flavia Cardenas, who worked in a nightclub, died of an overdose the next morning in Baton Rouge. After a prosecutor convinced a jury that McCasland administered the fatal dose, the 27-year-old pipe fabrication shop worker was found guilty of second-degree murder. He was sentenced to life in prison in February with no chance for parole.

Murder!

With deaths from heroin and opioids at their highest level in U.S. history, prosecutors have begun charging those who supplied the final dose with murder, even when that person is the deceased’s friend, lover, sibling or spouse.

Violence!!!  How bad is it? So bad that even mothers kill their children.

Last week, a 16-year-old Ohio boy was found dead in a motel room. Andrew Frye overdosed on heroin and fentanyl. He doesn’t look like a heroin addict. Andrew looks like a normal teenage boy. According to the Washington Post, Andrew’s mother, Heather Frye, lost custody of him, and he was being raised by a relative, Tammy Smith.

Like most teenagers, Andrew wanted a relationship with his mom. But unlike most teenagers, that desire would lead to his untimely death.

The next day, Andrew would die in that motel room. According to police, his mother called 911 after finding him cold and unresponsive. She told detectives she wanted to be the “fun weekend mom.” Andrew was in the room with his mother and grandmother, both heroin addicts. They obtained the heroin and gave some to Andrew. According to his mother’s statement to police, she made him go in the bathroom to shoot up, because she didn’t want to watch it.

Who can’t feel the tragedy?  And indeed, there are tragedies. But do tragedies lead to this?

But the destruction is much wider. Addiction and drug dealing ravage whole communities, urban and rural. We need look no further than the daily reports of the heroin epidemic today, or the still-vivid memories of the meth epidemic and the crack epidemic. Drug dealing makes whole neighborhoods war zones, places of economic blight and large-scale victimization. There is no greater single source of actual harm to Americans today — none. The cost of incarcerating drug dealers is small compared to the true cost of their crimes to society.

No greater single source of actual harm? Is Bill telling us the whole terrorist scare is bunk? Or just that there is plenty of scare to go around?

Knowing this, it is an utterly irresponsible effort to release experienced drug dealers from federal prison before they have completed their just sentences, arguing they are merely misguided business people or desperate individuals caught up in an unfair system. The truth about drug dealing is this: It requires cruelty and willful indifference to the visible suffering inflicted on others — over and over again — harming individuals, families and whole communities.

Just when you thought it was safe to engage in rational discussion, that life plus cancer wasn’t the absolutely necessary sentence to save the children, they resurrected Bill Bennett to work up the tragic stories of drug overdoses, the new tool of homicide charges to turn tragedy into violence, so that we would be convinced that ending the drug was would destroy society.

The Drug War. It’s back. Hi Bill.

18 thoughts on “The War on Drugs Is Not Dead Yet

  1. Jake DiMare

    “There is no greater single source of actual harm to Americans today”

    Besides the cholesterol, sugar, cancer, and terminal laziness, of course.

  2. Robert Newton

    ” It requires cruelty and willful indifference to the visible suffering inflicted on others — over and over again — harming individuals, families and whole communities.”

    Can’t that exact accusation be used against drug warriors, only more appropriately?

      1. TheHaywardFault

        The more exclamation points you use, the more righterest you are. Everyone knows that. Remember: It’s not hyperbolic if you’re RIGHT!‼!1!¡!onethousand‼!eleventyone‼

  3. Jim Tyre

    There are very few people who are bold enough to cite to a WSJ op-ed and link it to the anchor text “facts.” That’s how bold Bennett is. He is one bold dude.

    Perhaps he took the same bar review course I did. Most memorable lesson: if all else fails, the law is what is boldly asserted and plausibly maintained.

  4. Jack Dempsey

    “Except drug warriors are RIGHT!!!”

    And don’t forget the beheadings. I think it was Bill that said drug dealers should be beheaded in the streets. If Bill were in charge, he would be stiff competition for ISIS.

    1. SHG Post author

      Well, you have to admit it’s a damn effective specific deterrent, even if it falls slightly on the harsh side. Except it’s not too harsh. Nothing is too harsh for these murderers!!!

  5. Steve Hartson

    Bill’s “traffickers,” “experienced drug dealers,” and “violence” stand out as especially cruel and indifferent rhetorical flourishes when Juxtaposed against the sad crucifixions of Heather Frye and Jarret McCasland. Charge an OD’s associates with murder, and lock them up forever? Great plan-what could go wrong?

  6. awp

    “Boom. That’s why. See that part about our nation enduring a 440% increase in heroin overdose deaths? That’s the hook. That’s the scare tactic. That’s the new talking point of the drug warriors. If you look at his link, you will quickly realized that Bill is severely math-impaired. While the number is up, it’s not 440%. But it is up substantially, and most people can’t do math, and drugs are violence, so what’s the big deal?”

    eh,

    10,574/2,399=4.4

    1. SHG Post author

      Herp: 3.4/0.8=4.25
      Derp: You have to account for population (x per 100k) for numbers to mean anything.

      1. Patrick Maupin

        That’s not the most egregious error. Even if you ignore the small population growth and take the 4.4 number at face value, that’s still only a 340% increase…

        1. SHG Post author

          There are a variety of other factors that would also have to be taken into account (drug preferences shifting toward heroin and away from cocaine, for example) to make sense of numbers, but Bennett’s shrieks aren’t about such banal details, so it wasn’t worth the bother.

          And I’m a lawyer, so I don’t do math either.

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